Monday, December 13, 2010

Take from the known to the unknown - अरुन्धती-प्रदर्शन-न्यायः


The Ursa Major constellation is called the saptarShi सप्तर्षि (sapta-RiShi सप्त-ऋषि) or the seven sages. The second star from the tail-tip is Mizar which represents vasiShTha वसिष्ठ. It is a double star, and the faint star next to it is called Alcor, which is 'arundhatI' अरुन्धती (that which unblocks). To show this faint star arundhatI, one first points out the Ursa Major, then its tail star and then the faint arundhatI star.

After the wedding ceremony, one of the first rituals is for the groom to show the arundhatI star to the new bride as an ideal of marital harmony. Since the star is faint it is shown in steps from the most visible stars to the smaller one.

It is even said that one who can't see the star with naked eye, will soon be dying. This is held even in Japanese culture. And in Arabic cultures also, it was used a test of sharp eyesight.

What are the practical inferences from this?

In teaching someone, or showing a way, this method of going from the known to the unknown works much better.

Lead from the known to the unknown. Whether it is the new joinee at the company, a student at school, or your child - when explaining a new or complex concept, start from what is known to the other person. Build up on that step by step and take them to your vision, or the goal or the answer as the case may be.

When ‘selling’ new policies or programs, to employees or clients, start from what they know, and lead their path to the green pasture you are ‘selling’. Along the way, show how it is possible to traverse the path or implement the policy and what the benefits will be.

Change meets resistance of the unknown. If you remove the unknown factor, make people understand the journey and destination, they are more willing to travel with you.

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and now the language aspects -
arundhatI = one that unblocks (the path?)
rundh = to block, choke

pradarshana = show
dRik = to see
driShya = view (noun) as in "what a view!"
darshana = seeing of something/one
pra-darshana = to show, to put up a show, show off
pra-darshanI = exhibition, trade show

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(c) shashikant joshi । शशिकांत जोशी । ॐ सर्वे भवन्तु सुखिनः ।
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1 comment:

Charuta Sawant said...

Lovely... :) quite an interesting aspect of what the sky holds and how its so relevant to actual perspective learning approaches...

Charuta,
Mumbai

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